She said ''Hello, you fool, I love you.''

Sep 03
Sep 03

matt0044 said: So what's your take on the whole "Madoka teaches that girls should be punished" blablabla? It never once came off as though the series was telling us that the girls "had it coming" but rather that it wasn't right yet it was something that happened due to shortsightedness on their part. Like we're meant to sympathize with them.

silvermoon424:

I think that interpretation is total bullshit tbh. I NEVER got an impression of “Ugh, look at these girls, they’re so stupid for having FEELINGS and HOPE!!!” Rather, we’re meant to emphasize with the girls. We’re supposed to feel for them, to understand their struggles and root for them against all odds. We’re supposed to see Kyubey as the enemy, or, at the very least, disagree with his means.

The narrative never demonizes the girls for their wishes, either. We’re not supposed to think Mami is foolish and selfish for wishing to save her own life after she was nearly killed in a horrific car accident. We’re not supposed to think Kyoko’s an idiot for wishing to save her family and have people listen to her father. And sure, maybe Sayaka didn’t wish for Kyousuke’s hand to be healed for all the right reasons (in fact, this point comes up quite a few times), but she definitely makes up for it by fighting selflessly as a magical girl. It’s not the girls’ faults that their wishes were shortsighted or didn’t actually fulfill their desires. Kyubey never told them that the universe wouldn’t allow things to be thrown off balance and, as a result, wishes that warped reality (like Sayaka’s wish, for example) would eventually backfire. Kyubey never told them to sit down and think out every possible aspect of their wish and how it could potentially backfire or how it might affect those around them (like Kyoko’s wish). 

It baffles me that people actually think that PMMM is telling us that girls should be punished or that the characters “had it coming” when the narrative takes every opportunity to call Kyubey out and show the horrific effects that being a magical girl places on a girl if she’s not prepared. The entire finale is devoted to Madoka finally having enough of Kyubey’s bullshit and using the magical girl system to her advantage to make the world a little brighter, allowing magical girls to fight with hope and die without despair. 

I dunno, I think people just look for things to get offended about.

Sep 03

icyu81:

Two Best Friends Play: Prison Break

aka

Matt references one of my favorite movies Riki-Oh: The Story of Riki

[now readable]

Sep 03
Sep 03

fuckyeah1990s:

Björk, photographed by Spike Jonze, 1995

Sep 03
tokyoscum:

Shojo Kamen

tokyoscum:

Shojo Kamen

Sep 03

potentialforart:

ca-tsuka:

Oh yeah, it’s so hard to explain our passion for animators.

(from japanese TV drama Aoi Honoo)

Jesus

Sep 02

spacetwinks:

$5 off at suncoast!!!

Sep 02
Sep 01

thebobblehat:

findsomethingtofightfor:

petitetiaras:

You know what’s truly sickening about this particular scene? This dress (before the mice gave it a makeover) originally belonged to her deceased mother. Cinderella hardly has any personal possessions due to the greed of her stepmother and stepsisters. So, I assume that this dress meant quite a lot to her as a reminder of a simpler and happier time in her life. It symbolizes a fresh start and a chance at a better life for her.  It must have been traumatizing to see her dreams just destroyed, literally ripped from her, torn to shreds. Not to mention, they verbally abuse her calling her a “thief” and a “kitchen wench”. In the end when Cinderella is standing alone in rags, it’s animated so beautifully because you can feel this weight and this sense of hopelessness. Cinderella’s a girl who even said herself that no one could take away her dreams. But in this scene, you can see she’s giving up.

That’s why it is so important that Cinderella gets her happily ever after. Her Fairy Godmother is a symbol of faith and perseverance in hard times. After all, “Even miracles take a little time.”

I have to say I always hate it when Cinderella is criticized for needing “a man” or a “fairy godmother” to save her. Like I get that we should encourage independence and strength but I think people forget Cinderella was stuck in an abusive household.So often kids and even older teenagers get lost in households like that. There’s literally no way out for them. If anything we shouldn’t be criticizing Cinderella, we should be encouraging more people to become Fairy Godmothers.

THIS.